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Our Team

MD, MSHP

Joanna Hart

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Joanna Hart

Twitter

@JHartMD

Biography

Dr. Joanna Hart is a faculty member and attending Pulmonary and Critical Care physician at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on complex medical decision making. She has particular research interests in empirical bioethics, expectation formation, physician-attributable variation in care delivery, and behavioral phenotyping. Current research projects include physician use of and competency in choice architecture, stakeholders' views on physician use of benevolent deception, and expectation formation and accuracy among patients with advanced lung disease.

 

Dr. Hart received her undergraduate degree in Sociology from Northwestern University and her medical degree from the University of Virginia. She completed her Internal Medicine, Pulmonary, and Critical Care training at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and earned a Masters of Science in Health Policy Research from the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Dr. Hart provides inpatient critical care services at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and is on staff at the Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center, where she maintains an outpatient pulmonary clinic. She specializes in treating patients with tobacco-associated lung diseases. She is also deeply committed to the education of the next generation of physicians. Her teaching responsibilities include serving as a faculty facilitator for Doctoring, Pulmonary Medicine, and Bioethics courses at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine.

 

Dr. Hart lives and works in the West Philadelphia area, making her home in Cedar Park with her husband and two young children and three rescue dogs. Her family is always out and about enjoying the diverse and vibrant city of Philadelphia and they also enjoy traveling, especially to Latin America.

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